Questions and Answers about 'Support emotional and psychological development in early childhood'

 



 

Do Unborn Babies Face Emotional Stress During Pregnancy ?

Question:
Here is an interesting research article. London, England (LifeNews.com) -- New research conducted by doctors in England shows that unborn children can face emotional stress during a pregnancy as the baby's mother faces stress herself. Pro-life advocates say the study has implications for abortion as society learns more about the amazing development of children before birth. The British Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists released the results of the study on Thursday and says that unborn babies as early as 17 weeks into pregnancy suffer from stress. The stress results when hormones transferred from anxious mothers reach the baby through the placenta. Researchers measure the levels of cortisol, a stress hormone in 267 pregnant women and took blood tests and amniotic fluid samples from the babies. The fluid is a good indicator of what's happening because it's mostly produced by the baby during the pregnancy. The doctors found that when the cortisol levels rose in women a corresponding increase the in the levels in the amniotic fluid were found. The link grew stronger as the pregnancy advanced, the physicians said. Pampa Sarkar, an OBGYN who was involved in the study, discussed the results with the Metro newspaper in the UK. "We now need to carry out further work to unravel the mechanisms by which maternal stress affects the fetus, both during fetal life and through into childhood," she said. Sarkar suggested that mothers to be avoid stress and have a healthy and carefree lifestyle during the pregnancy and that her partner and family encourage her and be supportive during the nine months. Michaela Aston, spokeswoman for the pro-life charity Life, told the Metro that the study had an impact on the abortion debate because the stress levels were found at 17 weeks into pregnancy. She said that meant that babies were liking experiencing negative mental health effects of worried or anxious mothers who had abortions up to 24 weeks, the legal limit in Britain.

Answer:

Seeds of health are planted even before you draw your first breath, and that the nine short months of life in the womb shape your health as long as you live." These words of Sharon Begley and William Underhill in a Newsweek article Shaped By Life In The Womb eloquently describe the importance of the gestational period on an individual for his or her life-time. Some scientists now believe that the effect of the life in the womb on emotional and physical health may be greater than that of the genes we inherit. The conditions in the uterus, ranging from mother's hormones to the nutrients supplied through the placenta, may significantly determine how a baby's liver, heart, kidneys, brain and mind will function during the adulthood. In the Seventies and the Eighties, we learned that if mothers during pregnancy ingested such substances as the alcohol, cocaine, caffeine, and tobacco, they could harm their babies' physical and mental health, notably, lower the birth weight, height, and head circumference, and impair attention, memory, intelligence, and temperament. Likewise, we have known for a while that if a mother experiences excessive stress or suffers from an emotional trauma, her baby may be born with certain deficiencies which may persist into adulthood and cause more complications. In the Nineties, we are beginning to understand how the stress and mother's emotional state affects her unborn baby. Take, for example, a stress hormone called Cortisol. When we are under stress, we manufacture cortisol. If you experience occasional stress, cortisol doesn't create a problem. However, if you remain under stress for a long time, cortisol may be too much for your body to handle. Cortisol can cause high blood pressure problems. A mother's excessive Cortisol can reach the baby in the womb and raise the baby's set point for blood pressure forever. This baby, when reach adulthood, is likely to suffer from high blood pressure. Many mothers during pregnancy face extremely stressful circumstances. They are confronted with such unhealthy situations as the break-up of their marriage, physical or emotional abuse, open infidelity or simply disinterested and uninvolved partners who prefer staying out to staying home and supporting their pregnant partners. These mothers experience constant stress, shame, loneliness and, sometimes, clinical depression during pregnancy or after giving birth. The babies of these mothers are exposed to a variety of stress hormones, toxins and malnutrition inside the womb. Some of these babies will continue to live in the same or often worse noxious environment. No wonder some will later become hyperactive, underactive, inattentive, or temperamental and exhibit poor self-control. Many of these children are later medicated with Ritalin or antidepressants. Not everyone understands that the problems a child exhibits today may have resulted from events that occurred several years ago. Most of the gynecologists and obstetricians I have talked with are psychologically sensitive and recognize when their patients need psychological support. However, when referred for therapy, many feel embarrassed and hardly ever show up for psychological consultation. Their partners or families may not encourage them to seek help because the problem it is not seen as a medical one. Doctors are understandably reluctant to prescribe psychiatric medications because of pregnancy or breast-feeding considerations. Thus, a woman in such a situation suffers alone and remains isolated from her support system. She is expected to transcend all such adverse circumstances, and some do. Others don't have the emotional strengths to cope. Some have struggled with depression and anxiety all their lives. Moreover, even when they are seemingly coping with the excessive stress, they might still be constantly producing stress hormones and toxins and some will reach the baby in the womb. Maternal stress during pregnancy is also found to cause of asymmetry in coordination of ears, fingers, feet, elbows, etc. As a result, I.Qs of such children are found to be lower. Maternal stress is also linked with imperfections in the developing nervous system which can lead to problems of perception, thinking, and memory. All of us want happy children. Happy children grow out of happy babies. Happy babies are born to happy mothers. Therefore, partners, families and friends of expectant mothers should do their best to make an expectant mother happy and relaxed. If she is depressed, nervous, or tense, encourage her to seek help.

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why do i get so guilty and emotional after i have sex?

Question:
I don't want people judging me here and scolding me for having sex but i just need advice on how to deal with these things. Last week i started talking to a guy i used to chill with a year ago and our relationship was confusing on the border of 'friends with benefits' and 'boyfriend and girlfriend'. He came over last week and the other night and its like we're starting off where we left off- having sex, which is why i ended things in the first place. I havent had sex in a year so im dying for a mans touch and im not a slut its just hard seeing all my friends getting married and dating seriously and im the singleton. Anyways, so i think hes just wanting me for sex. I've asked him this and he denies it, obviously! But i dont trust him as i dont most men. Yesterday when he came over he had sex with me for an hour than left right after i was so hurt that i started crying when he left. maybe because ive been having a shitty week already. but i was so mad that i called up my friend that i know has the hots for me.we hung out with his friends and got incredible drunk than i had to stay at his house cuz i was too drunk to drive home. Since i was drunk, i was being emotional about this guy im seeing right now, and he told me to forget about him and that i deserve better. My friend started telling me all the things he likes about me and that hes always had a thing for me. He was looking straight into my eyes saying how beautiful and intelligent i was. And that he can have a real good conversation with him unlike lots of other girls he knows. He also said that im sexy without even trying and that he has alot of respect for me. I was so touched by this that i started seeing him differently and even though i was still abit drunk i knew what i was doing, i dont find him attractive but he touched me. We had sex, and than once more this morning and it was great. Hes not selfish in the sack at all. But once i got home i felt so horrible about myself i havent had sex in 1 year and this past 1-2 weeks i had sex like 5 times with 2 different men. Today when i got home i was crying for an hour because i dont know what im doing, and im losing myself. Im 21 and as long as ive known whenever i have sex i feel guilty after. maybe because im not in a proper relationship. i want a relationship but im scared to get really hurt. how do i get over my fears? should i not go have sex with these guys again? i feel i can do better but i never meet any guys im unbearably attracted to.

Answer:

I can relate to this and had a similar experience at your age. I think your current emotions are entirely natural given your confusion... and I think a lot of the conflict could come from letting yourself down and feeling guilty about that. Also, there is probably early programming coming from past experiences about intimate relationships, and trust etc. Maybe you can locate where this emotional conflict began, and work out what makes you feel guilty. A lot of our early sexual development, from puberty,even early childhood, can be skewed by mixed signal from our parents, and society about sex being wrong, and even punishable with pregnancy and S.T.D's. You have a biological need for closeness and it's natural, but you have absorbed some form of psychological programming that tells you what you need or want, or have experienced, isn't right. It could be the case that simply you experiences with the opposite sex haven't been right. When you DO meet the right person, who supports you emotionally, and wants to stay with you long enough to let you work through the emotional habits you have with sex, until they are resolved and turn into a healing experience, I'm sure things will be different. In the mean time, until you find your emotionally mature man, that you want to share your insecurities with.. forgive yourself ENTIRELY !!! Accept you are still learning about who you are and how you tick, and accept that discovering who you are is part of the rich tapestry of life! You feel you can do better, and I'm sure you can...whether you continue your relations with these guys is up to you... it's not harmful as long as you are comfortable with your experiences. My thoughts for you though are, try to make a commitment to yourself to create only positive experiences regarding your sexuality... whether that means choosing different types of guys, or sticking to a certain amount of physical contact and not going past a line, or staying celibate for a while til you work some of this stuff out. Don't compound your negative experiences by engaging with people in situations that ultimately lower your self esteem. Do stuff that makes you feel great! Valuable and worthy! If you suspect someone will 'use' you, keep a wide berth! I think there are lessons to be learnt in what you find attractive in a mate too... while you are operating on a negative program, you will find yourself attracted to people who validate this program, when you unravel the programming, you will be attracted to men for different reasons. I'm not in a great position to offer advice, because I'm still learning myself, 20 years on! Becoming self aware and realising you have a negative emotional habit associated with your choices, can help you make different choices in the future. Get a hold of the dvd 'What the Bleep do We Know' and discover how the brain taps into habitual emotional 'addictions'.... If you want to contact me via my profile page you can! Go easy on yourself, you'll work it out! xx

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Does art have an impact on children?

Question:
I was wondering if any of you knew some good websites that have to do with how art effects children when they are young and in elementary school? Thank you!

Answer:

Recent studies on school performance and childrens psychological development support the scientific basis for the promotion of arts and underscore the importance of art to inspire childrens imagination and creativity. New imaging technologies allow researchers to see inside the brain and witness the physiological impact of experience on brain activity and development. As a result, it is now known that brain development of children is sensitive to artistic stimulation and that these influences may be long lasting. Research shows that during childhood, billions of synapses or connections between neurons are being developed that lay the creative and communications groundwork for future learning. Consequently, if the arts are ignored or repressed in childhood, a unique opportunity is lost. Development Process ICAF concurs with field experts consensus that a childs natural or even learned cognitive processes can influence development for the better, both in the short and long term during a childs life. Some theorists believe that biological endowment and early experience combine to shape a young childs personality in ways that remain stable throughout much of life. Others believe that as the child grows, biological and cultural influences on personality are increasingly mediated through the childs own cognitive (or social-cognitive) processes, and therefore a person always retains the potential to alter the course of his or her own development. These experts say that people are not simply products of society, but are active participants in their own socialization. Therefore, all aspects of social behavior and development result from an interaction between an individuals own characteristics and his or her social experience. Development is indeed an active, dynamic process; to be more precise it is the interaction of many processes because development occurs simultaneously in a number of domains; the physical, the intellectual, the emotional, and the social. This rule applies to psychological as well as biological development, yet with differences in the patterns of growth. Although sometimes development takes a quantum jump, it is a continuum with advances upward and forward. Children are not miniature adults. The qualitative and quantitative changes that occur in the developmental continuum transform the child into an adult. What Is Creativity Creativity has been defined as the arrangement of preexisting forms, objects, and facts in a new order by conceptual and emotional activity of the mind. The essence of creativity is to find a new thing and use it in a new way. Art offers a most valuable and enjoyable opportunity for expression of imagination, fantasy, emotions, and creativity. The urge to create is universal. During the preschool years this urge is likely to be intense, and the creative spirit inherent in every child needs to be encouraged if his or her free expression is to survive. By age seven or eight, the childs drawing may reflect the realism slowly permeating his thought, making him more like most of us, lacking in spontaneity, imagination, and creativity - unless the danger is recognized and something is done to check the pull towards conformism. Although their vision is direct, fresh, and personal, childrens artwork during preschool years may not be looked upon as creative because the visual appeal of such artwork is often due to pure chance, not technical ability. Unfortunately, by the age of seven or eight, which has been referred to as the magic years or the flowering for child art, most children lose spontaneity and artistic creativity. (J. H. Dileo, MD. Child Development: Analysis and Synthesis, Brunner/Mazel Publishers, NY, 1977). This is often because of fundamental changes in the childs goals and orientation, the preference for words as mode of self-expression and infusion of the need to reproduce exactly what they see and observe. Limits can be placed on childrens creativity by an educational system that encourages imitation in learning rather than spontaneity and creative imagination. It is not enough to expose children to good art. They must make art if they are to benefit. Red Alert on Diminishing Creativity Because of this research, ICAF believes that 8- to 12-year-olds are at a critical point in their development. Some field experts have assessed that in many cases creativity actually diminishes with age. Eight- to twelve-year-olds become increasingly realistic and practical and more concerned about how their work will be evaluated by peers and adults. It is imperative that they retain some of the spontaneity and imaginative expression of their earlier childhood years. Critical Importance of Child Art Art can play an effective role in contributing to the intellectual, emotional and aesthetic life of children. Art can supplement, if not surpass, the spoken word as a medium of communication. Child development experts agree that visual arts are valuable because of their unique attribute of presenting content all at once. In a painting, for example, composition, color and relationships are simultaneously presented to the viewer. Through artworks, children reveal their preferences and attitudes, which in turn reflect their values and those of their societies. This attribute of art is instrumental for ICAF because of the foundations objective to promote global communication among children of all cultures through the universal language of art. Art can be timeless and universal. Art can be a unifying principle. Each child may observe an object in a peculiar way or may uniquely express it in art form. But when artworks are displayed, they transcend the language the artist knows and speaks, his race and creed, his gender and age, his community and nationality. This universality of art can bond children and adults in celebrating the creativity, the imagination and the spirit of mankind. ICAF is aware that a proactively art-rich life is even more important today because children are influenced by high-tech graphics and special effects on television and websites and in movies and computer games. In this age of rapidly advancing technology, children are often confused and uncertain about the value and acceptance of their own personal imagination and creativity. One expert has observed that teaching a child to paint is teaching a child to see. The following observations by other field experts reveal the importance of child art: Child art has the power to improve academic performance by enticing students into the learning process because confidence and recognition achieved in art are reflected in other subject areas. Child art leads to good work habits because painting and drawing involve concentration and cultivate self-discipline. Child art involves creative discovery and self-expression because students learn how to address problems in innovative ways. Child art lets adults know how children are growing, intellectually and emotionally. Child art helps students understand their own as well as other cultures. Child art makes leisure enjoyable and meaningful for students. Child Art & Adult Art Child art has not only fascinated prominent artists, but has been inspirational for some great masters. The interest in child art goes back to the Romantic Movement when the so-called naivete of a childs creation was interpreted as genius because children could see the truth and express it. In awe of the instinctive awareness of children, many masters tried to emulate the childs objectivity, unself-conscious expression, whimsical creativity and simplicity of form. From the turn of the twentieth century to the onset of World War I, child art was prominently exhibited in important art centers around Europe every year. Many old masters openly acknowledged the impact of child art on their works. Many modern masters also confess their fascination with and attraction to it. Professor Jonathan Fineberg observed that "many prominent artists, including Kadinsky, Paul Klee, Pablo Picasso, and Joan Miro have been intensely interested in the art of children collecting it, exhibiting it (sometimes along their own work), and most important of all, taking specific formal cues from it Since the mid-60s, increasing number of artists, ranging from Jasper Johns to Jonathan Borofsky, from Joseph Beuys to Jean-Michel Basquiat, have turned to childhood thought patterns as a way of experiencing the world with greater directness. Indeed, it is clear that many artists today seek a richer, more authentic experience of the present through encounter with the childs "innocent" eye." (The Innocent Eye, ARTnews, April 1995). The impact of child art is evident both in the masters works and words: Id like to study the drawing of kids. Thats where the truth is, without a doubt. - Andre Derain I always entreat the good Lord to give me my childhood back, that is to say, to grant that I may see nature and render it like a child, without prejudice. - Camille Corot The artist has to look at life as he did when he was a child and if he loses that faculty, he cannot express himself in an original, that is, personal way. - Henri Matisse The older I get and the more I master the medium, the more I return to my earliest experiences. I think that at the end of my life I will recover all the force of my childhood. - Joan Miro It took me a whole lifetime to learn to draw like children. - Pablo Picasso It is clear that activities aimed at promoting child art also support adult art. By paying attention to child art an adult can focus on the origins of his or her own creative mind. The freshness of a childs vision may refresh, invigorate and enlighten an adults creative perspective and style. The Joy of Art as Play In play, children learn to cooperate, to share, to delay gratification of their impulses, and to imagine themselves in the roles of other people. Play has much value for a childs social, emotional, physical and intellectual development. Naturally, a major change occurs in play as children develop from preschool age to early elementary school years. A new form of play appears where the players compete to win the game. Such games are of major importance in terms of childrens social and intellectual development. Competitive creative activities can help nourish personality characteristics in children which include persistence, self-confidence, independence of judgment, flexibility, openness to new experiences, tolerance of ambiguity, and even a good sense of humor. Creative children are more likely to be playfully curious about the world.

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What are some research findings on infant memory?

Question:
Psychologically speaking.

Answer:

"Childhood Amenisia" and the role of the hippocampus is one discovery in the area of developmental psychology that has been made in the past 100-and-some years of psychological studies. "Childhood Amenisia Infantile, or childhood amnesia is characterized by the relative absence of memory before 3 or 4 years of age. It is important to note that the term does not refer to complete absence of memories, but the relative scarcity of memories during infancy — a scarcity that cannot be accounted for by a forgetting curve.[citation needed] Additionally, the boundary is malleable and can be influenced by both individual experiences (Usher & Neisser, 1993) and cultural factors (Wang, 2001). Research has demonstrated that children are adept learners and are quick to acquire and retain information. Children do remember events; however, these memories accessible as children are lost to infantile amnesia in adulthood (Bauer, 2004; Fivush, et al., 1987). Early observations Childhood amnesia, despite being the universal human experience that it is, was only first formally studied in 1893 by the psychologist Caroline Miles (Miles, 1893; Bauer, 2004). In 1904 G. Stanley Hall noted the phenomenon in his book Adolescence (Hall, 1904). But it was Sigmund Freud who offered one of the first, most famous, and most controversial descriptions/explanations of childhood amnesia when he tied the phenomenon in with his other psychological theories (Freud, 1916; Bauer, 2004). Modern observations Much research in this area today aims to identify new characteristics and possible explanations for the phenomenon. For example, one recent study compared childhood and adult memories and found surprisingly few substantive differences, despite expected differences in the emotional vs factual and episodic vs non-episodic content of the memories (West, et al., 1999). Another example is Eacott & Crawley’s study which found support for childhood amnesia in the very few memories their subjects recalled from before the age of 2 ½. They found that participants’ memories of this time were also characterized by consistent false memories. But when asked about an event they could not possibly have a memory of, the subjects showed they had no problem with telling apart knowledge of an event and a memory of the event, suggesting something peculiar about the false memories observed in childhood amnesia (Eacott, et al., 1998). Proposed explanations Since Miles first officially documented childhood amnesia as a psychological phenomenon, many theories of its causes and character have been developed. Some of the most notable are described here to aid in understanding what childhood amnesia may be. It is worth noting that many of these theories are highly controversial and the true nature of childhood amnesia is still being debated. Freud’s trauma explanation Sigmund Freud’s theories of psychosexual development are highly intertwined with childhood experiences, and Freud’s explanation of childhood amnesia is one of the most controversial. In what is now published as The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Freud theorized that childhood amnesia is the result of the mind’s attempt to repress memories of traumatic events that, according to Freud, necessarily occur in the psychosexual development of every child. This would lead to the repression of the majority of the first years of life (Gleitman, et al., 2004). Some evidence has been found that could support the repression theory. In one study, high school and college students were asked to recall the nature of their earliest memory. In the first phase, high school students were found to have much later earliest retrievable memories, many of which featured traumatic events. In a retest several months later, 42% of the high school students reported a different earliest memory, and many of these new memories were markedly less traumatic than the ones they had recalled the first time (Kihlstrom, et al., 1982). At the same time, Freudian theory, including his explanation for childhood amnesia, has been severely criticized. One criticism is actually about the evidence, often anecdotal rather than purely scientific, and said to frequently permit multiple interpretations (Gleitman, et al., 2004). Criticism specifically of the Kihlstrom experiment includes the observation that no part of the study actually involved children, but rather adolescents and young adults (Bauer, 2004). Physical development explanation Another often-cited explanation of childhood amnesia is that the infant’s mind is not mentally mature enough to create long-lasting autobiographical memories. In particular, it is not until the age 3 or 4 that toddlers have a mature hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These regions of the brain are known to be associated with the formation of autobiographical memories of the type notably missing from adult recollection of early childhood (Gleitman, 2004; Newcombe, et al., 2000). Language explanation The incomplete development of language in young children may be a cause of childhood amnesia in that infants do not have the language capacity to encode autobiographical memories in a manner that their language-based adult selves can interpret correctly. Indeed, the typical schedule of language development seems to support this theory. Babies of one year old tend to be limited to one word utterances, and childhood amnesia predicts that adults have very few, if any, memories of this time. By the age of three, however, children are capable of two or three word phrases, and by age five their speech already resembles adult speech. This language development seems to very much correspond to childhood amnesia because it is around the age of three to four that is the time of most adults’ earliest recallable memory (Gleitman, et al., 2004). Gabrielle Simcock and Harlene Hayne of the University Otago conducted an experiment with very young children. [1] The researchers synthesized a "memorable experience" for child subjects in which a toy was inserted into a machine that ostensibly analyzed it and produced a miniature replica of the toy as the children watched. After one year the children were shown photos of the experiment. Children of all ages "exhibited evidence of verbal and nonverbal memory." However, they described the experiment verbally using only the language they had acquired by the time of the event, despite having acquired substantially more language in the intervening year. Hayne and Simcock conclude "that language development plays a pivotal role in childhood amnesia."[1]" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childhood_amnesia

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I have an essay to write for school. My subject is corporal punishment. I want to find infomation to support

Question:
I would like all views on this subject and if you have a web sight that could give me more detail that is great. I would also like to know some answers to some questions also. 1. What is the best for of punishment for a 4 year old that behaves in one of the following ways: a.Hits a smaller child: b.Yells at his or her parents: c.Steals candy from the store: 2. What is the best form of punishment for a 10 year old that behaves in one of the following ways: a.Hits a smaller child: b.Yells at his or her parents: c.Steals candy from the store: 3.In your opinion, what is the effect of spanking a child? For example, do you think it teaches self-discipline? Or do you think it causes psychological problems? 4. In your opinion, should parents use different types of punishment with boys and girls? If so, how should it differ?

Answer:

I love essays on this topic and I hope to help you! Spanking doesn't teach self-discipline and it may cause psychological problems. No true professional evidence shows that it is beneficial and effective for children's social, emotional and intellectual development. I have studied this in my early childhood development courses. I have 3 of my own and never use this lazy form of parenting (spanking). My children are confident, happy, well behaved and have self control. We always get compliments on how wonderful they are. Alot of old fashioned people think that spanking children were the good old days and blame parents who don't spank for the state of people today. Spanking is easy because it lets you rule your children through fear. Anyone can be a parent and most just rely on old habits and impulses. It is a cycle that continues and continues. An intelligent disciplinary method is using reasoning at the child's level of understanding. Using physical discipline proves that the person lacks intelligence especially in early childhood development. But you will often hear "I was spanked and I turned out fine." The common justification on this site from people claiming that because they were spanked, this is why they turned out great. It is possible to raise great kids without hitting them. As a parent, you need to make an informed decision on how you discipline your child. Probably about 95% of people on this site will tell you all the great things about spanking. They say "I got spanked and I turned out fine, spare the rod etc." Most will justify it by saying "Spank out of love, not anger or there is a difference between spanking and abuse or only spank them if they are about to touch a hot stove or run into the street." These comments are the most popular ones of pro-spankers. These people seem to think that spanking has to be the only alternative to good behavior. I am in favor of discipline and believe that you can raise a spoiled, unruly, aggressive, uncontrollable child if you are a permissive parent. These types of parents provide no discipline at all and let their children run the show, give in to them or just have no structure, rules, consequences or consistency. Yes, I was spanked by both parents. I am against it and we use time-out, removing priviledges or redirection (distracting) for toddlers under 2 years old. It really works for us because they respect us and do not fear us. Spanking is one of the easiest ways for parents because it lets you rule your children through fear. Pro-spankers raise their children relying on hitting because that is how they were raised. Their tendency is to have no motivation to learn and improve. They lack child development education, have had no parenting classes and most likely do not work with children professionally. They blame (not spanking) for the state of people today. You can raise a self confident, happy, well behaved child without spanking. Check out the supernanny website or the dr Sears website. They have such great, effective ways of discipline that really work. Hitting just teaches that it is okay to hit and you sure don't want your little child one day as an adult being so angry at you for spanking them. The more educated people are on this topic, the best they will be at parenting. Parents who spank seem to lack a bit of intelligence. After all your research, you probably will change your mind about spanking your children.

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what kind of personality traits does a person develop?

Question:
when they were bullied either as a child or in adult situations

Answer:

Dear The Blood of Jesus, Being bullied Seem To Lead To Weak Social Skills,PPL. with social issuer pretty interested at looking into their childhoods and speculating about what caused them to end up as shy, awkward adults. Bulling lead to weak people skills.Some people experience them and come out okay, while others are more affected. People who have social issues will likely have many of these apply to them. Because so many factors can apply to one person, they also tend to interact with and reinforce each other. They mainly affect people by leading them to: Become more insecure& unconfident about their worth as people.Become more doubtful about their ability to do well in social situations.Miss chances to gain social practice and experience.Feel more anxious and worried in social situations.Pick up unhelpful social behaviors and beliefs, instead of learning better ones. Certain in-born personality traits seem to predispose people to having social problems as adults. Having a particular personality doesn't mean you're destined to have social issues, just that if you're already leaning towards being awkward, certain life events can more easily 'activate' it. Some people are born with a more inhibited, nervous approach to the world than others. Their nervous systems are just wired to be more reactive or sensitive to stimuli. Even as babies and toddlers they'll have a stronger negative response to change and new things in their environment. They also tend to take longer to 'warm up' to new situations.People who are more cautious and intolerant of risks can also fall behind their peers because they're not as eager to jump right into things like dating, partying, or learning to drive. Being bullied can kill people's self-esteem and make them anxious about future interactions. It can also leave someone feeling wary and bitter about other people and socializing in general.Children typically get picked on by their peers, but they can also feel put down and bullied by their parents, siblings, or other adult authority figures.the bully-victim group had the greatest risk of health problems when they were adults. They R more likely to be diagnosed with a serious illness, smoke or have a psychiatric disorder than people not involved in bullying.victims and bully-victims were more likely to be in the lower-income percentage of young adults.Bullies appear to be children with a prevailing antisocial tendency who know how to get under the skin of others, with bully-victims taking the role of their helpers.serious illness, poor social relationships and struggling to hold down a regular job are a snippet of the effects of those exposed to bulling at a young age. Bullying can have harmful effects on childhood development, and the latest research reveals those detrimental influences may even stretch into adulthood, depending on how victims handle the trauma.The bullied participants also will B having a hard time keeping long term friendships and staying in touch with their parents and having the most problems with employment and relationships were the bully-victims The intensity of the emotional pain bullying elicits, and the fact that other people underestimate how much hurt they feel makes being bullied an incredibly traumatic experience that can leave significant emotional scars,lasting effects of bullying highlight the importance of not only preventing it but helping victims to develop proper coping mechanisms, The relationships children have at home, i.e, can be critical for minimizing the lasting harm bullying can have,& addressing instances of bullying early can also limit profound psychological damage.Some people are more resilient and tend to do some of these healing and curative things naturally. They might seek out their close friends and get emotional support from them, and by doing so remind themselves that they’re accepted and appreciated. For others, however, such strategies may be harder to adopt, and some children may instinctively withdraw and isolate themselves as a way to protect themselves from further rejection. But by doing so, they leave their psychological wounds untreated and increase their feelings of isolation, Bulling show clear risk factors for suicidal thinking and behavior among young people involved in bullying. Among them: self-injury, such as cutting, emotional distress, running away, and previous trauma in childhood, such as physical or sexual abuse.People who are victims of bullying find themselves being bullied due to their achievements, do not have a large circle of friends, subjected to unwarranted teasing and rumors, and tend to be more serious about important things in life such as school or work. Most people who are targets of bullies have something different about them. Maybe they wear thick glasses, dress differently, or are painfully shy. Many are awkward in social situations and try not to draw attention to themselves.

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Whats your fifth house sign and how many planets do you have there?

Question:
My fifth house is aries and intercepted by taurus and is empty! Guess I would not be lucky enough when it comes to children. And I also have a virgo moon, which is quite barren. I am only 16 and I know I shouldn't be thinking about children but I was grieved to know that my fifth house has a barren sign and is also empty and I love children so much! Anyways, what are your desires related to children and what are your placements in the fifth house and also state your sun moon and rising signs. I'm a libra sun, virgo moon and sagittarius rising. I said I might be unlucky because I also have a saturn sitting there according to the equal house system. http://www.astro.com/cgi/chart.cgi?rs=3&btyp=w2gw&;&cid=mobile-vitfilecdJPUO-u1374838711 @Give me a baby, thats so sweet. I am so glad actually that there's someone who feels the same as me. :') I feel so good after reading your answer. I wish I could give you the best answer but Been there deserves it more. Thanks anyways. :)

Answer:

Your 5th house is how YOU parent. Not your children themselves. Moon in Virgo is your emotional nature, not pregnancy. And if you insist on being too symbolic, remember that Virgo is the sign of the harvest .. of crops that ripen. You love children, yes. You are enthusiastic about them, since you have Aries on the cusp of your 5th. But you will be self-centered and will not naturally attend to your children's psychological needs ... Aries is self-absorbed, and must work hard to train themselves to notice the needs of others. This could be very gbad for your children. As far as not having any planets IN the 5th house, that means only that you will not meet your needs by having children. Planets represent our inner needs, and the house a planet is in indicates where, in life, we seek to meet that need. No planets in the 5th means that you don't fulfill yourself with kids, even though we all have biological instincts to reproduce. As for parenting style, it is helpful to have Moon in Virgo to help counterbalance the self-absorption of Aries-parenting styles. Virgo wants to serve and wants to do it "right". So your emotional needs push you to be unselfish and attend to details. This helps counterbalance and the self-absorption of Aries, and hopefully does not damped the enthusiasm of Aries when it comes to your children. I have Pisces on the 5th house and no planets in the 5th house. Neptune is in Libra in the 11th house, and well-aspected to Pluto, Sun and Mercury .. no other aspects. Moon is in Cancer in the 9th, opposite Jupiter and sextile Mars. Yes, I enjoy nurturing others. I did not want children until I was in my 30's ... 4 planets in Gemini, total of 6 planets in Air, and I was too busy, too occupied with other things to want to retreat into parenthood (you cannot do everything in life all at the same time, and parenthood takes tremendous focus to pull if off well .. kids do NOT raise themselves). My daughter, now grown, says that my love and support made the difference between her killing herself and her surviving. She is schizophrenic, first diagnosed at age 7 (early-onset), and was in turmoil for about a decade before things were settled out so that she can live a reasonably-normal life. I sacrificed everything so that she had a chance at life .. literally (well, Pisces/Neptune will do that easily enough, and Moon won't mind doing it too much). It worked out . She's stable not for many many years, enjoys her career, lives in a condo her grandfather bought for her. It worked out .. ruler of my 5th, Neptune, is well-aspected. And we are very close, although we only spend Sundays together. There is a saying: Every child has its own brand of tears for the mother. I have yet to run across any mother who does not agree with that statement. As for your chart, you do not have Taurus intercepted in the 5th. Taurus would be intercepted only is ALL of Taurus was within the 5th house .. in other words, the cusp of the 5th would be Aries and the cusp of the 6th would be Gemini. This is not the case in your chart. You do have MOST of the sign in Taurus in your 5th house .. BUT Aries is on the cusp, so Aries rules your 5th house. Mars in your chart makes good aspects to Sun, Mercury, Uranus and Neptune. It is square Moon, meaning that you will have emotional problems with your kids .. particularly getting angry at them (both Mars square Moon, and Mars conjunct Pluto). I would suggest you take some courses in daycare courses to learn about childhood development and how to work with and nurture children .. so you don't screw your kids up. Parenting well will not come naturally to you ... and, unfortunately, when we don't do a good job with our kids we never get over it, because we remain parents forever.

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please help me with this thanks =]?

Question:
ok so all i need is help with this homework. I have to create my own curriculum for course on adolescent psychology. i have to include topics, reasons for the topics and ideas for teaching the topics.. I need an example to this.. i was wondering if you can give me examples on how to do this. i dont want you to do this for me all i need is help coming up with the ideas.. Thank you Please no rude comments have no time for it

Answer:

[edit] Adolescence Adolescence, the transitional stage of development between childhood and adulthood, represents the period of time during which a person experiences a variety of biological changes and encounters a number of emotional issues. The ages which are considered to be part of adolescence vary by culture, and ranges from preteens to nineteen years. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), adolescence covers the period of life between 10 and 20 years of age. Adolescence is often divided by psychologists into three distinct phases: early, mid and late adolescence. more don't know if this help Adolescence is the intermediary stage of growth between childhood and adulthood. It represents the period of time during which a person is subjected to an array of biological transformations and runs into a number of emotional tribulations. The ages, which are termed to be part of adolescence, vary by ethnicity and extend from the preteens to nineteen years. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), adolescence encompasses the epoch of life between 10 and 20 years of age. Adolescence is an especially unstable as well as a vibrant period of any person?s life. Adolescent psychology deals with the issues related with adolescence. Numerous psychologists all over the world now recognize this as a distinct phenomenon. This has led to the establishment of a separate class of specialized psychologists to deal with the issues of the adolescence. The American Psychological Association has a special segment to assist them. Psychological issues of adolescents may include maturity in body, which leads to a curiosity about sexual activities, sometimes leading to teenage pregnancy. Apart from that, there is a tendency to experiment with drug and alcohol use. In some cases, cerebral problems such as schizophrenia, eating disorders, and depression may also arise during adolescence. The emotional insecurity among some adolescents may also tend to cause instances of crime among youth. It is often seen that searching for a distinctive identity is one of the problems that adolescents face. It is also common for individuals to express their desire to be more like their role models such as athletes, rock or pop stars, and film and television performers. Relationship with peers plays an important role in analyzing adolescent psychology. It is seen that 90% of adolescents associate themselves with a peer group. Adolescents receiving support from their peers are less probable to fall into depression or face anxiety. It is also seen that depressed individuals find it difficult to make friends. The nature of an adolescent?s behavior is greatly influenced by his friends and companions. Adolescent psychology has gained prime importance in the recent past due to increased cases being reported about adolescent depression and anxiety. Psychology provides detailed information on Psychology, Online Psychology Degrees, Forensic Psychology, Child Psychology and more. Psychology is affiliated with Mountain Retreats. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Peter_Emerson

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Do I suffer from Borderline Personality Disorder?

Question:
I know that only a psychologist who sees me can answer more definitively. But that's not an option for me at the present moment (long story). In the meantime, I want to better understand my problems, in order to be able to address them, because my life has literally been destroyed and left in ruins because of my psychological problems: Here's my info: 1. I'm a male in my early twenties. 2. I was never abused during childhood, as I know is common for BPD. 3. I lived a childhood with few friends--non of whom were real friends. My social life was very abnormal. I was very talkative and interacted much with other children, and played a lot, and was involved extracurricularly. I was bullied--but not in the stereotypical sense. I was not the geek with glasses who always got beaten up. I often stood my ground, but many times I was overwhelmed by the fact that so many were against me, and the frequency. I was often ostracized by many, made fun of, and excluded from parties, and group-work. I had to actually ask to be included in groups for group work. 4. My parents were very warm and involved in my upbringing, and alwasy available. Not at all cold or distant. However, they were often over-protective, and had many behavioural standards (some very stringent) that I had to live up to. Much of this had to do with theri coming from a diffrent cultural backgorund, but also because my family had endured much discrimination and aggression, and so they always were cautious and wanted me to be cautious. Now, in terms of how I feel. Please note that I have a very high level of self control, and often resist these feelings--and so people can't tell that I feel this way, but I'm just expressing how I feel inside: 1. I am very emotionally needy. When it comes to women, I am desperate for their love and affection. When it comes to everyone, I am desperate for their acceptance, approval, and pity. When it comes to elders, I am desperate for their fatherly and motherly roles--I want to be treated as their child whom they care about. When it comes to women, I find I'm attracted to older women and women who are affectionate. I almost feel like begging people to be my friends, to accept me, to let me hang out with them, for women to date me and care about me. Understand that this is extremely embarassing for a person to admit--especially a young man such as myself. I understand that it would be quite self-defeating to express these feelings, as they would simply result in further alienation because no one likes clingy, needy, desperate individuals. They are perceived as losers. That is why I don't express them, and most people can't tell. I don't feel this way because I'm inherently lacking in positive qualities. I don't mean to brag but I'm attractive, intelligent, have acocmplished (up to my psychologicla breakdown) quite a bit in life, and have been able to attract women when I've put on the fascade of confidence and non-desperation. However, my concern is not to achieve practical results such as make friends or hook-up with women, althought these are desirable. My primary concern is to become a stable person first, and to overcome these feelings of shame. Why can't I approach my neediness, desperation, and emotinal begging as any other destructive habbit such as overeating, binge-drinking, unhealth eating, not exercising. Why is it that I can't help but attach so much moral baggage and shame to these traits. I know they're negative and I would like to change them. But I can't help but feel them, and I feel so much shame and guilt and self-hate and self-disgust everytime I feel them. I have no one whom I can trust enoguht to divulge such information, except my parents, with whom I feel very uncomfortable divulging such matters, and who make me feel great shame and guilt and self-hate when I express to them such feelings--my guess because they are afraid that I will act on them, and that htey will result in my social self-destruction and self-humiliaiton, but I'm not sure. But when I am able to express myself to them--at least partially--I feel a huge sense of relief, comfort, happiness, and destress--even if I am berated, shamed, and humiliated. I don't know why it feels so good to express yourself in spite of the fears and inhibitions to do so. I want to know if what I'm experiencing is just run of the mill depression and anxiety problems or BPD?

Answer:

Your Answer: I would say no, you do not have BPD. First of all 75% of BPD patients are female. 2nd of all many of them experience more "severe" symptoms than what you are describing. You speak of dependence, and emotional needieness etc. A person with BPD will also often exhibit impulsive behaviors and have a majority of the following symptoms: •Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment •A pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization and devaluation •Identity disturbance, such as a significant and persistent unstable self-image or sense of self •Impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging (e.g., spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating) •Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behavior •Emotional instability due to significant reactivity of mood (e.g., intense episodic dysphoria, irritability, or anxiety usually lasting a few hours and only rarely more than a few days) •Chronic feelings of emptiness •Inappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g., frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical fights) •Transient, stress-related paranoid thoughts or severe dissociative symptoms Have you heard of Dependent Personality Disorder? I think this is more what you are describing: What is dependent personality disorder? Dependent personality disorder (DPD) is one of a group of conditions called anxious personality disorders, which are marked by feelings of nervousness and fear. DPD also is marked by helplessness, submissiveness, a need to be taken care of and for constant reassurance, and an inability to make decisions. DPD is one of the most frequently diagnosed personality disorders. It appears to occur equally in men and women, and usually appears in early to middle adulthood. What are the symptoms of dependent personality disorder? People with DPD become emotionally dependent on other people and spend great effort trying to please others. People with DPD tend to display needy, passive, and clinging behavior, and have a fear of separation. Other common characteristics of this personality disorder include the following: •Inability to make decisions, even everyday decisions, without the advice and reassurance of others •Avoidance of personal responsibility; avoidance of jobs that require independent functioning and positions of responsibility •Intense fear of abandonment and a sense of devastation or helplessness when relationships end; often move right into another relationship when one ends •Over-sensitivity to criticism •Pessimism and lack of self-confidence, including a belief that they are unable to care for themselves •Avoidance of disagreeing with others for fear of losing support or approval •Inability to start projects •Difficulty being alone •Willingness to tolerate mistreatment and abuse from others •Placing the needs of their caregivers above their own •Tendency to be naïve and to live in fantasy What causes dependent personality disorder? Although the exact cause of dependent personality disorder is not known, it most likely involves both biological and developmental factors. Some researchers believe an authoritarian or overprotective parenting style can lead to the development of dependent personality traits in people who are susceptible to the disorder.

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