Questions and Answers about 'Operate firefighting equipment'

 



 

is firefighting an avaliable job in the marine corps?

Answer:

Crash crew: MOS 7051 - - Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Specialist: Job Description: Personnel of MOS 7051 employ firefighting equipment and extinguishing materials to rescue victims involved in aircraft crashes and to fight fires. Typical duties include operating, servicing, inspecting, and testing aircraft rescue and firefighting vehicles, firefighting systems, controls, and rescue equipment, controls and rescue equipment; instructing personnel in the techniques and procedures rescue and firefighting. Structure fire fighting: MOS 8811, Firefighter the firefighter performs various duties incident to firefighting and fire prevention. Participates as member of a crew in controlling and extinguishing fires. FYI: the yahoo search bar should be in the upper right corner of your screen. I pulled up 322,000 hits in .27 seconds.

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Question on Marine Corp MOS?

Question:
I was curious if there is a Military Ocupational Specialty In the marine Corp that resembles a fire fighter heard something about it but haven't seen it anywhere.

Answer:

First if you want to enlist I suggest learning how to spell CORPS Another thing. It's really amazing what you can find when you simply time something into google. That took me maybe a whole 30 seconds to find. Also the Marines don't guarentee any jobs so good luck getting that. Summary. The firefighter performs various duties incident to firefighting and fire prevention. Participates as member of a crew in controlling and extinguishing fires. Requirements/Prerequisites. Complete appropriate firefighting/fire prevention course and obtain certification as a firefighter I/Fire Inspector I from a DOD Fire and Emergency Services Certification Program or other approved fire training agency. Duties (1) GySgt to Pvt: (a) Performs firefighting/fire prevention duties as assigned. (b) Performs daily checks and routine maintenance on fire apparatus as required and or assigned. (c) Uses fire reporting procedures detailed in OPNAVINST. (d) Files and logs correspondence, records, and reports. (e) Operates firefighting equipment such as pumps, hoses, extinguishers, ladders, self contained breathing apparatus, and hose reels. (f) Employs proper type hoses, extinguishers, forcible entry tools, and other firefighting equipment; and performs rescue and salvage work. (g) Fills fire extinguishers with appropriate agent when required. (2) GySgt and SSgt: (a) Updates Status boards and charts. (b) Prepares fire reports (OPNAVINST 11320.25) and reports of inspections. (c) Examines electrical wiring and heating units for faulty insulations, and fuel leakage of improper installation. (d) Recommends changes or modifications to existing conditions to reduce fire hazards. (3) GySgt: (a) Conducts investigations and prepares written reports on causes of fires, property destroyed, or damaged and corrective measures required to prevent future occurrence of similar fires. (b) Inspects barracks, buildings, and adjacent areas on military installation for fire hazards; and advises corrective measures for improperly stored flammable materials, blocked exits or aisles, and accumulation of combustible waste. (c) Prepares official correspondence. (d) Determines and recommends when fire investigations are required MCO P11000.11. (e) Establishes and supervises a two-platoon firefighting department and fire prevention branch. (f) Takes total responsibility for fire suppression and prevention at the installation. (g) Performs as the chief fire officer. Related DOT Classification/DOT Code (1) Firefighter 373.364-010. (2) Fire Inspector 373.367-010. Related Military Skill. Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Specialist, 7051

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can someone tell me what a FIRE TECHNICIAN does?

Question:
can someone tell me what a FIRE TECHNICIAN does?

Answer:

CLASS SPECIFICATION County of Fairfax, Virginia CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 DEFINITION: Performs technical duties in a distinct functional area in the Fire and Rescue Department and related work as required. Specific assignments include: apparatus, emergency medical services, Hazardous Materials Response Team, Technical Rescue Operations Team, fire protection equipment and systems testing, inspections, investigations, training, and supply and equipment. DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLASS: Employees in this class perform technical duties in a distinct functional area. Instructions and guidance are furnished with non-routine situations or conditions; however, employees at this level normally exercise initiative and independent judgment. Fire Technicians assigned to Fire Suppression differ from Firefighters in that Fire Technicians operate firefighting equipment and perform firefighting duties as lead workers. Fire Technicians assigned to Emergency Medical Services may be assigned to a paramedic fire engine as the advanced life support provider, driver of an advanced life support unit, or as the crew leader on a basic life support unit. Regardless of area of assignment, all uniformed fire and rescue personnel that are medically qualified for field duties as a firefighter must maintain a level of fitness sufficient to enable them to participate in fire suppression and rescue activities when the need arises, as demonstrated by successful completion of a work performance test (unless granted light duty due to illness or injury). ILLUSTRATIVE DUTIES: Apparatus Technician Drives a pumper, ladder truck, tiller or rescue squad to/from alarms; Operates a pumper at draft or fire hydrant; Operates a specialized unit, such as a boat, hazardous materials unit, or technical rescue unit; Inspects vehicles and mechanical equipment to ensure that they are working properly, and reports malfunctions to supervisor; Performs routine maintenance on vehicles and equipment; Trains Firefighters in the safe and efficient operation and maintenance of firefighting and rescue apparatus; Coordinates and oversees work details at the station or at incidents; Participates in firefighting, rescue, and emergency medical duties. Emergency Medical Services Technician – Advanced Life Support (ALS) Provider As an ALS provider on an Advanced Life Support Unit (ALSU) or Paramedic Engine, provides advanced emergency medical care to stabilize the condition of the critically ill/injured prior to and during transport to a medical facility; Administers advanced emergency medical procedures (e.g., creating airways, interpreting and treating cardiac arrhythmias, performing defibrillation, electronic pacing, cardioversion, and/or electro-cardiographic monitoring); CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 2 Determines the nature and extent of injury or illness, establishes priorities for required emergency care, and determines if Advanced Life Support Care or medivac is needed; Drives the BLSU or ALSU to and from emergencies; Conducts primary and secondary patient survey; Collects pertinent information for patient assessment, including the patient's past and present medical history and transfers this information to appropriate medical personnel; Takes vital signs and stabilizes patient; Conducts assessment to determine treatment of a patient with suspected respiratory, cardiovascular, or central nervous system disorder, and begins treatment; Determines subsequent treatment based on patient reactions, responses and conditions; Performs cardiopulmonary resuscitation; Carries out emergency childbirth procedures; Treats trauma-induced injuries, and assists with the treatment of medical emergencies (e.g., drug overdoses, seizures, diabetic reactions); Notifies authorities of suspicion of child and elder abuse; Operates the mobile display terminal (MDT) system; On the station computer, enters information from written reports into the Department reporting system; Prepares and presents in-station drills; Participates in firefighting and rescue duties. Hazardous Materials Response Team Responds to accidental and intentional releases of hazardous materials; Detects the presence of hazardous materials using specialized electronic instruments and product testing materials; Identifies the hazardous material’s chemical and physical properties by using reference books, computerized databases, and information retrieved from industry experts; Develops a hazardous materials incident site characterization diagram, to include topography, location of sewers and storm drains, exposures, natural bodies of water, and location of hazardous materials; Develops a technical site safety action plan, to include work zones, evacuation plans, “hot zone” action levels, and other emergency procedures for all site workers; Obtains gas, liquid, or soil samples to evaluate hazardous material concentrations; Performs damming or diking procedures to stop the spread of hazardous material; Performs decontamination procedures on citizens, departmental personnel, tools, and equipment; Oversees/directs off-loading procedures when products are transferred from container to Container; Tests meters and equipment, and ensures sufficient haz-mat supplies are on hand; Conducts target hazard preplanning and walk-through of buildings known to contain hazardous material to become familiar with the layout; Conducts, develops, and participates in hazardous materials response team training; Participates in firefighting, rescue, and emergency medical duties. CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 3 Technical Rescue Operations Team Participates in underground rescues; Stabilizes and works in building collapses, trench cave-ins, and high-angle, below-grade and confined-space rescue situations; Shores, and makes safe, a trench or collapsed building, and establishes a safety zone around the trench/building collapse to prevent further collapse; Prepares, inspects and utilizes a variety of rope systems for ascending, descending and hauling tools, equipment and people. Evaluates the dangers of a confined space, safely entering into and egressing from confined spaces using personal protective clothing, gear, and breathing equipment; Searches for victims, evaluates victim's condition, prepares victims for removal, extricates victims, and provides basic life support; Operates hand tools, power tools, and dewatering devices; Ventilates a trench or confined space prior to rescue; Excavates trenches and breeches/tunnels through structures; Protects victims and self from utility equipment; Develops, conducts or participates in training in all aspects of technical rescue operations; Participates in firefighting, rescue, and emergency medical duties. Fire Protection Equipment and Systems Testing Section Inspects commercial buildings and facilities under construction to ensure that the components of their fire protection water system (e.g., main water line, standpipes, sprinklers, pump) are properly installed and comply with all applicable fire and life safety codes/standards, and that their fire protection equipment (e.g., smoke detectors, fire alarms, stairwell pressurization, smoke evacuation systems) operate properly; Witnesses performance tests on fire protection equipment/systems conducted by the installing contractor; Prepares reports on the status, test results, etc. of the fire protection equipment and systems inspected at each job site, issues Notices of Violation and summonses, and secures warrants as required by law; When more than one agency has enforcement jurisdiction over identified code violations, coordinates actions with inspectors or code enforcement personnel from other agencies (e.g., Department of Environmental Management, Health Department) to resolve deficiencies; Keeps abreast of changes in code requirements, new systems technology, and other related fire protection matters; Attends recertification training; Answers inquiries from contractors, developers or owners regarding fire protection equipment and system requirements, as well as installation deficiencies; Investigates, and assists in troubleshooting, problems in fire protection equipment and systems in existing buildings. Inspections Section Inspects buildings and facilities to ensure compliance with the Virginia Statewide Fire Prevention Code and Fairfax County Fire Prevention Codes; CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 4 Serves as technical assistant to the Fairfax County Building Official in the enforcement of the Virginia Petroleum Storage Tank Regulations and aspects of the Uniform Statewide Building Code affecting life safety and fire protection prior to occupancy of the building or structure; Prepares reports of inspection, issues Notices of Violation and summonses, and secures warrants as required by law; Receives and responds to telephone calls, inquiries and requests for information from the public, business community and other government agencies regarding fire prevention regulations and fire safety; Coordinates inspections and code enforcement actions with other government agencies; Attends mandated recertification training and keeps abreast of technical developments with the fire protection and fire prevention industries. Investigations Section Investigates/determines the origin and cause of fires and explosions; Interviews witnesses and examines incident scenes for evidence as to the cause; May assist in other types of investigations (false alarms, hazardous materials incidents); Works closely with local, state and federal law enforcement agencies in investigative functions; Prepares reports on the results of the investigation and actions taken; Prepares, obtains and executes search and seizure/arrest warrants; Keeps abreast of federal, state and local statutes and ordinances pertaining to criminal investigations; Assists the Commonwealth’s Attorney with the preparation of cases being prosecuted in court, and testifies in court. Training Section As an instructor in the Fire and Rescue Academy, trains career and volunteer firefighters in a variety of areas, including forcible entry, hose placement, ventilation techniques, search and rescue methods, the use of tools/ropes/knots/breathing apparatus, the care and maintenance of fire and rescue equipment, and emergency medical treatment and transportation procedures; Determines the training objectives, develops training programs, and utilizes educational principles to facilitate program enhancement; Tests students to determine the skills attained; Recommends remedial training; Oversees practical evolutions. Supply and Equipment Branch Coordinates the activities of the Supply and Equipment Branch, which includes the Fire Warehouse and the Fire and Rescue Department’s delivery truck; Repairs fire, rescue, and emergency medical equipment (e.g., fire hose, nozzles, oxygen, breathing apparatus, stretchers); Coordinates special equipment repairs with outside vendors, other County agencies, and departmental staff; Evaluates items turned in by fire stations as to serviceability and need, using a current CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 5 knowledge of standards set by the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) for fire/rescue/emergency medical equipment and supplies; Performs a technical review of incoming equipment/supply shipments to ensure they meet OSHA, ANSI, NFPA, and departmental standards; Responds to emergencies to address special supply/equipment needs; Reviews outgoing transfer vouchers, supply requests and repair requests for accuracy. In all functional areas Performs housekeeping tasks at fire stations and on their grounds; Maintains records as necessary, and completes incident reports; Attends training sessions and participates in drills; Participates in the physical fitness program. REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES: In all functional areas Knowledge of laws, regulations, departmental policies and procedures, standard operating procedures, training manuals and safety bulletins covering the area to which assigned; Knowledge of streets and target hazards in assigned area; Knowledge of appropriate types of safety gear and procedures, and the ability to use them correctly; Knowledge of the principles and practices of fire suppression; Knowledge of firefighting equipment and supplies; Knowledge of the principles and practices of fire prevention, the Virginia and Fairfax County Fire Prevention Codes, other codes pertaining to fire prevention or life safety, and compliance methods; Ability to perform basic life support techniques, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation on infants, children, and adults; Ability to remain calm under stress; Ability to use sound judgment in making independent decisions; Ability to communicate orally in an effective manner; Ability to maintain effective working relationships with coworkers, volunteers, and the public; Ability to follow written and oral instructions; Ability to coordinate or lead the work of coworkers, the public, and other workers (such as utility workers) responding to the scene; Ability to write complete, concise, and accurate reports; Ability to train others in an area of specialization; Ability to analyze situations and, giving due regard to the circumstances, adopt an effective course of action which follows accepted practices. Apparatus Technician Ability to safely drive a pumper, ladder truck, rescue squad, tanker, or other Fire and Rescue Department vehicle in all weather conditions and in other hazardous situations; Ability to train others in all aspects of the apparatus to which assigned; CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 6 Ability to identify the various types of hose loads and racks, deploy all hose lines carried on the apparatus, and recognize defective hoses; Ability to supply water from static and residual water sources and maintain proper pressure to supply attack lines, supply lines, master stream devices, foam devices, relay operations, shuttle operations, and fire protection systems; Ability to operate the aerial device. Emergency Medical Services Technician – ALS Provider Knowledge of advanced emergency medical procedures, techniques, drugs, and equipment related to emergency treatment of life-threatening illnesses and injuries, familiarity with when they should be used, and the ability to apply them appropriately; Knowledge of Basic Life Support techniques; Knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the major systems of the body; Knowledge of the principles of triage, and the ability to apply them in multiple casualty incidents; Knowledge of the causes, signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, dehydration, and overhydration; Ability to effectively rescue injured persons from hazardous situations; Ability to comprehend medical terminology and follow complex instructions relayed by a physician; Ability to accurately assess and monitor a patient's condition; Ability to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation on infants, children, and adults; Hazardous Materials Response Team Knowledge of soil conditions; Knowledge of what type of leak control and containment device can be used for a given type of leaking container and given type of hazardous material; Knowledge of natural drainage, sanitary, and storm water management systems, and the procedures used to handle haz-mat incidents in each; Knowledge of basic chemistry, such as the characteristics of acids, bases, and gases; Knowledge of sources from which to obtain authoritative information about hazardous material; Ability to effectively rescue injured persons from hazardous situations; Ability to read and interpret chemical data information reference materials. Technical Rescue Operations Team Knowledge of the basic rules of physics (e.g., the laws of force, resistance, action-reaction, use of a fulcrum point on a lever, cause and effect of physical motion, and momentum); Knowledge of different types of anchors and multi-anchor systems, and the ability to use them properly; Knowledge of different rope systems (e.g., hauling, lowering and repelling systems), and the ability to use them properly; Knowledge of building construction, construction materials, structural terminology and support systems; Knowledge of search and rescue techniques, including tunneling, breaching, and penetrating; Knowledge of different types of structural collapses (e.g., pancake, V, and lean-to collapses); CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 7 Knowledge of shoring and supplemental shoring procedures; Ability to effectively rescue injured persons from hazardous situations; Ability to read diagrams and blueprints sufficiently to effect a rescue. Fire Protection Equipment and Systems Testing Section Knowledge of fire protection equipment and systems; Knowledge of basic building construction practices; Ability to prepare concise and accurate legal notices and reports of inspection; Ability to conduct fire safety inspections in public buildings to ensure code compliance; Ability to read building plans to determine compliance with the Fire Prevention codes and other pertinent codes; Ability to effectively apply appropriate codes and standards. Inspections Section Knowledge of basic building construction practices; Ability to read blueprints; Ability to conduct inspections of buildings and facilities to ensure code compliance; Ability to prepare concise, accurate legal notices and reports of inspection; Ability to effectively apply appropriate codes and standards. Investigations Section Knowledge of investigatory practices and techniques; Knowledge of local, state and federal statutes; Knowledge of the judicial system; Ability to properly process arrestee into the judicial system; Ability to use a firearm; Ability to recognize and gather evidence pertaining to the origin and cause of fires, explosions, and other incidents; Ability to effectively testify in court. Training Section Knowledge of instructional techniques/methods, and the ability to apply them effectively. Supply and Equipment Branch Knowledge of OSHA, ANSI, and NFPA standards for fire, rescue, and emergency medical equipment and supplies; Ability to repair fire, rescue, and emergency medical equipment to meet prescribed standards. EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS: Any combination of education, experience, and training equivalent to: High school graduation or a G.E.D. issued by a state department of education; Successful completion of the post-recruit school probationary period; Two years of paid field experience, following graduation from recruit school, as a Fairfax County Firefighter, AND Refer to the Fairfax County Fire & Rescue Department’s Career Development Handbook for an explanation of the promotional criteria that will be used for this CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 8 rank. Possession of a Class A medical rating in the assigned medical group. Accommodations will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Current Fire Technicians wishing to move from Suppression to EMS, or vice versa, may do so by taking the Fire Technician promotional examination in the opposite specialty field. Employees successfully completing the examination in the opposite specialty field will be placed on the appropriate eligibility list and selected for transfer in accordance with the standard practice. CERTIFICATES AND LICENSES REQUIRED: Current certification as a Commonwealth of Virginia Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-A or EMT-B); Certification as a Hazardous Materials First Responder in accordance with Fairfax County training standards; Certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automatic electronic defibrillation (AED); AND Possession of a valid Motor Vehicle Driver’s License. Emergency Medical Services Technician – ALS Provider Certified as an Advance Life Support Provider at National Registry Emergency Medical Technician/I (EMT-I) or National Registry Emergency Technician/P (EMT-P) OR as a Commonwealth of Virginia EMT-I or EMT-P; Certification as a full Advanced Life Support provider (Status A, B or C) in Fairfax County and in full accordance with all current County training standards; Certification in Advanced Cardiac Life Support; AND Certification in Basic Trauma Life Support. Apparatus Technician Certification as an apparatus technician in accordance with departmental training standards. Hazardous Materials Response Team Certification in hazardous materials, in accordance with departmental training standards Technical Rescue Operations Team Certification in technical rescue operations, in accordance with departmental training standards. Position, based on the availability of the training: If assigned to the Fire Prevention Division: Certification as a Fire Inspector II in accordance with the standards of the Virginia Department of Fire Programs; Certification as a Technical Assistant to the Fire Official in accordance with the standards of the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development. Investigations Section Certification as a Fire Investigator II in accordance with the standards of the Virginia Department of Fire Programs; Certification in basic law enforcement in accordance with the standards of the Virginia CLASS CODE: 4234 TITLE: FIRE TECHNICIAN GRADE: F-19 Page 9 Department of Criminal Justice Services; Semi-annual weapons qualification. Hazardous Materials Enforcement Branch Certification as a Fire Investigator II in accordance with the standards of the Virginia Department of Fire Programs; Certification in basic law enforcement in accordance with the standards of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services; Certification in blasting and explosives enforcement; Certification as a hazardous materials technician in accordance with Fairfax County training standards; Certification in hazardous material sampling and air sampling, in accordance with Environmental Protection Agency training standards; Semi-annual weapons qualification. REVISED: September 3, 2004 REVISED: October 7, 1998 REVISED: June 4, 1998 REVISED: August 23, 1996 REVISED: February 14, 1991 REVISED: January 19, 1989 REVISED: October 26, 1987 REVISED: July 1977

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wildland and structure firefighting?

Question:
look i know some good detail about the job i volunteer at a station and have done some prescribed burns. Im about to hit a crossroads in my fire career in doing city or wild im a emt trainee and i like the wildland aspect but i dont know to go to structure (wich was my first choice) what i want to know is is their a full time wildland jobs because all i hear is about seasonal and wildland firefighters make crap is that true? if you have done both which one did u like i have talked to many firefighters they all say wildland because well theirs the real fire and structure is more just medical then fire.plz help me out and really i want opinions and answers from firefighters not normal ppl like sometimes i do get.

Answer:

Hi First off good luck whichever road you go. I am not sure where you are located (State) but many full time Wildland Firefighter Jobs are found with State or Federal agencies. the US Forest Service, US Fish and wildlife, Bureau of land management and US Park service to name a few. Most of that is done thru USA Jobs on line. Local Wildland Jobs are thru State agencies usually a state forest service/Division of Forestry or emergency management, best bet there find a state jobs website. Many of these jobs require you to live within so many miles of your duty station. As for structural, pretty much most departments are looking EMT at least and Paramedic usually so If medical is not your thing it is something to consider. Best bet there get with local departments and see the requirements where I am we have a State Fire College ( several actually) you pay to go get your standards and apply and hope from there. I would try to see if a department will sponsor you many times if you volunteer they will. You may have to pay for classes but the agency may provide the gear and save you some money. I will be honest with you I love Wildland Firefighting been doing it for about 14 years full time employment and wouldnt do anything else. When not fighting fire we do it all construction, maintenance, prescribed burning, Fire Prevention programs, Land management work etc. Do your homework the structure side tends to pay more, and there schedule is a bit better once you clear the " new guy " hurdles most of that is medic training and clinical time etc. It really depends on what you want to do. Where I am we require a HS Diploma and good record and we send you through our training as opposed to having to get your certs yourself. We operate Heavy equipment if that is the case in your area and Wildland is your passion do yourself a favor: Get some heavy equipment experience, work on getting a CDL (commercial drivers licence) and Take IS 700 and IS 800 online Incident command courses, and look at getting S190 and S130( L180 is included now )those are the most basic of wildland courses and a great start and look good on a resume when applying. If your local Forestry allows volunteers from Fire Department to take the "pack test" do that get your red card and go out west on a hand crew or engine crew and see what you think. And many departments will allow you to do this so you can do your structure and still fill that wildland void if you want, best of both worlds but refer to your departments rules. Structure is not all medical, it is a lot of it in my opinion but vehicle accidents, structure fires etc it covers it all. When it is "fire season" Fire is all I do, when it is not it is the other things I mentioned many of us on this side dont work the wrecks or medical so that may be why they are telling you they do "more or real fire" where I am from it is a big team and we are glad to have each other. Sorry for the long answer. PS I was on here looking for a forum to advertise a Fantasy Football League for Wildland Firefighters I started up and figured I would try to help you if I could... Again Best of luck and be safe.......

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I leave 4 Houston to take my fitness test 4 a firefighting job in iraq 4 wakenhunt sv dose anyone no wat it is?

Question:
Any help will be nice???

Answer:

Course includes instruction in techniques of firefighting and fire protection operations for aircraft, structures, missiles, weapons, miscellaneous fires, and emergency first aid procedures. Other areas covered: Performing rescue and firefighting operations during structural fires, aircraft crash incidents, vehicle emergencies and natural cover fires, performing emergency response duties during hazardous materials incidents, operating pumps, hoses and extinguishers, forcing entry into aircraft, vehicles and buildings in order to fight fires and rescue personnel , driving firefighting trucks and emergency rescue vehicles, giving first aid to injured personnel, inspecting aircraft, buildings and equipment for fire hazards, and repairing firefighting equipment and filling fire extinguishers.

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What should our Criminal Justice/Firefighting club do for an activity?

Question:
Need new ideas for the club for the school year... it has been hard to get people involved in the past. We have a small town to operate in and limited funds.

Answer:

How about a "Jail-a-thon" where local celebrities (get the mayor, maybe someone at the radio station, the school principal) get "arrested", and have to call folks to raise "bail". It can be fun, and a good fundraiser - the "jail" can be as simple as crepe paper "bars" strung up, or a "ball and chain" around the ankle. The club can provide the "jailers" - maybe even a judge and jury, and the sheriffs to "arrest" the willing participants - stress WILLING. It takes a bit of organizing, but can be a good activity and a good fund raiser - maybe buy a new piece of equipment for your fire company or police!

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Army firefighter VS. Airforce Firefighter?

Question:
hi, can some people please tell me the ups and downs of being a airforce firefighter and a army one, and a little info on what exactly they do, and if you know their salaries, i am also curious about that too. thanks

Answer:

The pay and benefits will depend on your rank, location and type of unit (Active, Reserve, National Guard). Army (most are Guard or Reservist, very few are Active Duty) Army firefighters (MOS 21M) are responsible for protecting lives and property from fire. Firefighters control fires and help prevent them in buildings, aircraft and aboard ships. Firefighters supervise or performs firefighting, rescue, salvage and fire protection operations. Your training is: 11weeks, 1 day at Goodfellow Air Force Base, TX where you'll learn instruction in techniques of firefighting and fire protection operations for aircraft, structures, missiles, weapons, miscellaneous fires, and emergency first aid procedures. Other areas covered: Performing rescue and firefighting operations during structural fires, aircraft crash incidents, vehicle emergencies and natural cover fires, performing emergency response duties during hazardous materials incidents, operating pumps, hoses and extinguishers, forcing entry into aircraft, vehicles and buildings in order to fight fires and rescue personnel , driving firefighting trucks and emergency rescue vehicles, giving first aid to injured personnel, inspecting aircraft, buildings and equipment for fire hazards, and repairing firefighting equipment and filling fire extinguishers. For more info: http://usmilitary.about.com/od/enlistedjobs/a/21M.htm Official info: http://www.goarmy.com/JobDetail.do?id=137 Forums about the MOS: https://forums.goarmy.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=96118&tstart=165 USAF The Air Force MOS: 3E7X1 - FIRE PROTECTION, Plans, organizes, and directs all fire protection activities. Analyzes fire protection operations, determines trends and problems, and formulates corrective measures. Provides fire protection guidance. Coordinates fire protection support agreements and pre-incident plans. Executes and enforces the Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program. Conducts and evaluates training on specialized fire protection equipment and procedures. Performs inspections and organizational maintenance on fire protection vehicles, equipment, and protective clothing. Manages and operates fire alarm communications centers. Supports the electrical power production function with resetting aircraft arresting systems. Provides fire prevention guidance. Performs project reviews to ensure fire safety feature adequacy. Inspects facilities, and identifies fire hazards and deficiencies. Determines fire extinguisher distribution requirements and performs inspections and maintenance. Establishes public relations and conducts fire prevention awareness and educational training. Controls and extinguishes aircraft, structure, wildland, and miscellaneous fires. Establishes an emergency operations incident command system. Drives and operates fire apparatuses, specialized tools, and equipment. Conducts hose evolutions and pump operations, and protects exposures. Preserves and protects emergency scene evidence. Investigates fires to determine origin and cause. Effects entry into aircraft, structures, and other enclosures. Shuts down engines, safeties ejection systems, and isolates utilities. Conducts search and rescue operations. Administers emergency first aid. Training is also conducted at Goodfellow AFB, TX along with the Army. For more info: http://usmilitary.about.com/od/airforceenlistedjobs/a/afjob3e7x1.htm Where you can be assigned in this MOS: http://usmilitary.about.com/library/milinfo/afjobs/assignments/bl3e7x1.htm AF Forum about the job: http://www.afforums.com/forums/archive/index.php/f-94.html

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How is it decided which firemen go to a fire?

Question:
i am doing a report on the hitory of fire departments and i need to know how they are run and operated

Answer:

Firefighter's Handbook: Basic Essentials of Firefighting ... Firefighter's Handbook: Basic Essentials of Firefighting - Abbreviated Version of the Firefighters Handbook Covers the Basics of Firefighting for Fire ... www.contractor-books.com/DE/FFighting_Hbk_BEOF.htm - 27k - Cached - Similar pages # Nautical Know How - Fire Fighting Basics for Boaters Thus, for firefighting purposes, there are actually seven possible fire classes. Knowledge of these classes is essential to firefighting, as well as knowing ... boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/022298tip2.htm - 24k - Cached - Similar pages # Basics begin, but shouldn't end, with Firefighter I Today the fire service faces a deadly paradox. 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are there roles of figherfighter in the british army or is it just the RAF?

Answer:

Firefighter (21M) Active Duty Army Reserve All Army bases have their own protection services, including fire departments. Army firefighters are responsible for protecting lives and property from fire. Firefighters control fires and help prevent them in buildings, aircraft and aboard ships. Firefighters supervise or performs firefighting, rescue, salvage and fire protection operations. Some of your duties as a Firefighter may include: Perform rescue and firefighting operations during structural fires, aircraft crash incidents, vehicle emergencies and natural cover fires Perform emergency response duties during hazardous materials incidents Operate pumps, hoses and extinguishers Force entry into aircraft, vehicles and buildings in order to fight fires and rescue personnel Drive firefighting trucks and emergency rescue vehicles Give first aid to injured personnel Inspect aircraft, buildings and equipment for fire hazards Teach fire protection procedures Repair firefighting equipment and filling fire extinguishers

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AirForce Firefighter Deployment?

Question:
So recently I found out that the job i'm going to have in the Air Force is a firefighter. I was wondering how often firefighters in the airforce deploy, and if you do get deployed are you only on an airbase or do you go out to forward operating bases with other branches like the army or the marines? I couldn't find much information about this online so any help would be much appreciated. Thanks

Answer:

Your deployments will revolve around flight line operations. You have forward operating tactical sights that have the minimum in the way of firefighting equipment and you have strat sights where the amount and type of aircraft is more robust and so is the support for them including AGE and fire rescue. At those locations the commander might be Air Force or could be Army or Marine Corps. A lot of these places are joint military in nature with the Army and Marine Corps providing security and maintaining the camp or base parameter and performing other duties off post. Many have an Army or Marine Corps commander whose job is to maintain the viability for operations to take place and is in charge of the entire camp, post, or base. You will also have an Air Force counter part who is responsible for maintaining the viability for flight line operations and insuring that those are conducted as safely as conditions allow and at the rate needed to sustain operations and the continued supply of the base. Most stuff is flown in to those forward locations so that scheduling, unloading, and flow of air assets is a big thing and I supervised that several times during my military career when deployed. A simple way of looking at this and explaining it is if it was flight line operations or flight line area then it was my responsibility while that Army or Marine Commander had the responsibility for the camp or base overall.

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