Assessor Resource

MARL010
Apply basic principles of marine electrotechnology

Assessment tool

Version 1.0
Issue Date: August 2018


This unit involves the skills and knowledge required to explain basic marine electrotechnology principles and to perform basic electrical calculations.

This unit applies to the work of Marine Engineering Watchkeepers on commercial vessels greater than 750 kW.

This unit forms part of the requirements for the Certificate of Competency Marine Engineer Watchkeeper issued by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA).

You may want to include more information here about the target group and the purpose of the assessments (eg formative, summative, recognition)



Evidence Required

List the assessment methods to be used and the context and resources required for assessment. Copy and paste the relevant sections from the evidence guide below and then re-write these in plain English.

Elements describe the essential outcomes.

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

1

Explain how material properties affect resistance of electrical conductors

1.1

Terms and symbols used in the formula for resistivity are used correctly

1.2

How resistance varies with changes in conductor length and cross sectional area is outlined

1.3

How resistance varies with temperature is outlined

1.4

Calculations are performed that illustrate how material properties affect resistance of electrical conductors

2

Apply Ohm’s Law to electrical circuits

2.1

Main sources of EMF are identified

2.2

Terms and symbols used in Ohm’s Law are used correctly

2.3

Calculations are performed using Ohm’s Law to solve problems involving internal, external and variable resistances in both series and parallel circuits

2.4

Calculations are performed to determine power required and /or energy expended by electrical devices

2.5

Circuits for a wheatstone bridge and a slide wire bridge are sketched and their application on a ship is outlined

2.6

Calculations are performed dealing with resistances, currents and voltage drops in bridge circuits under null or balanced conditions

3

Apply principles of electrolytic action to electrical cells

3.1

How the theory of electrolytic disassociation when applied to common electrolytic solutions and electrode materials explains the generation of EMF from chemical sources, is outlined

3.2

Primary cells are distinguished from secondary cells

3.3

Calculations are performed to solve problems involving currents, voltage drops and terminal potential difference of cells connected to form batteries in series and in parallel

3.4

How capacity of a battery is measured is explained

3.5

Construction of typical batteries used in marine environments is outlined

4

Apply principles of electromagnetism to EMF generation

4.1

Form and properties of the magnetic fields surrounding single conductor and multi-turn solenoid coils when carrying an electrical current are compared and contrasted

4.2

Terms and symbols used in Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws of electromagnetic induction are used correctly

4.3

Calculations are performed using Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws of electromagnetic induction to solve problems related to electromagnetism and EMF generation

4.4

Fleming’s Right Hand Rule is outlined

5

Explain operation of direct current rotating machinery

5.1

Construction and methods of maintaining and repairing typical direct current (DC) machines are illustrated

5.2

Principle wiring arrangements used with DC machines are outlined

5.3

Action of the commutator in DC generators is outlined

5.4

Significance of Back EMF (Eb) in the operation of DC motors is outlined

5.5

Mathematical formula are applied to show relationships between operational parameters of DC motors

5.6

Calculations are performed to solve simple problems relating to power output and efficiency in DC motors

6

Explain operation of AC rotating machinery

6.1

How three-phase AC may be developed out of simple single phase AC is explained

6.2

Difference between Star and Delta connections is outlined

6.3

How a three-phase supply can generate a rotating magnetic field is explained

6.4

Construction of an AC synchronous generator is outlined

6.5

Construction of an AC induction motor is outlined

6.6

Calculations are performed to show how driving torque is produced in an induction motor

7

Explain parallel operation and load sharing of generator

7.1

Load/voltage curves of AC and DC generators are compared

7.2

Main requirements for satisfactory power sharing between both AC and DC generators are outlined

7.3

Sequences that occur when load changes on two DC generators working in parallel without an equaliser connection are outlined

7.4

Effect of varying power factors on the load/voltage curve of an AC generator is outlined

Evidence required to demonstrate competence in this unit must be relevant to and satisfy all of the requirements of the elements, performance criteria and range of conditions on at least one occasion and include:

applying relevant work health and safety/occupational health and safety (WHS/OHS) requirements and work practices

assessing own work outcomes and maintaining knowledge of current codes, standards, regulations and industry practices

identifying and applying relevant mathematical formulas and techniques to solve basic problems related to marine electrotechnology

identifying and interpreting numerical and graphical information, and performing mathematical calculations such as resistance of electrical conductors, power output and efficiency in DC motors, and driving torque in induction motors

identifying, collating and processing information required to perform basic calculations related to marine electrotechnology

performing accurate and reliable calculations

reading and interpreting written information needed to perform basic electrical calculations

solving problems using appropriate laws and principles.

Evidence required to demonstrate competence in this unit must be relevant to and satisfy all of the requirements of the elements, performance criteria and range of conditions and include knowledge of:

AC:

rotating machinery

principles

basic electrical circuits

basic principles of marine electrotechnology

batteries

DC:

rotating machinery

motors

difference between AC and DC

electrical:

current

power

safety

units of measurement

electromagnetic:

induction

force

effective verbal, written and visual communication techniques

Ohm’s Law

parallel circuits

principles of electromagnetism and electrolytic action

resistance

series circuits

WHS/OHS requirements and work practices.

Assessors must satisfy National Vocational Education and Training Regulator (NVR)/Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) assessor requirements.

Assessment must satisfy the National Vocational Education and Training Regulator (NVR)/Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) standards.

Assessment processes and techniques must be appropriate to the language, literacy and numeracy requirements of the work being performed and the needs of the candidate.

Assessment must occur in workplace operational situations or where these are not available, in simulated workplace operational situations or an industry-approved marine operations site that replicates workplace conditions where basic principles of marine electrotechnology can be applied.

Resources for assessment include access to:

electrical diagrams, specifications and other information required for performing basic electrical calculations

relevant and appropriate tools, equipment and personal protective equipment currently used in industry

relevant documentation including workplace procedures, regulations, codes of practice and operation manuals

technical reference library with current publications on basic marine electrotechnology.

Performance should be demonstrated consistently over time and in a suitable range of contexts.


Submission Requirements

List each assessment task's title, type (eg project, observation/demonstration, essay, assingnment, checklist) and due date here

Assessment task 1: [title]      Due date:

(add new lines for each of the assessment tasks)


Assessment Tasks

Copy and paste from the following data to produce each assessment task. Write these in plain English and spell out how, when and where the task is to be carried out, under what conditions, and what resources are needed. Include guidelines about how well the candidate has to perform a task for it to be judged satisfactory.

Elements describe the essential outcomes.

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

1

Explain how material properties affect resistance of electrical conductors

1.1

Terms and symbols used in the formula for resistivity are used correctly

1.2

How resistance varies with changes in conductor length and cross sectional area is outlined

1.3

How resistance varies with temperature is outlined

1.4

Calculations are performed that illustrate how material properties affect resistance of electrical conductors

2

Apply Ohm’s Law to electrical circuits

2.1

Main sources of EMF are identified

2.2

Terms and symbols used in Ohm’s Law are used correctly

2.3

Calculations are performed using Ohm’s Law to solve problems involving internal, external and variable resistances in both series and parallel circuits

2.4

Calculations are performed to determine power required and /or energy expended by electrical devices

2.5

Circuits for a wheatstone bridge and a slide wire bridge are sketched and their application on a ship is outlined

2.6

Calculations are performed dealing with resistances, currents and voltage drops in bridge circuits under null or balanced conditions

3

Apply principles of electrolytic action to electrical cells

3.1

How the theory of electrolytic disassociation when applied to common electrolytic solutions and electrode materials explains the generation of EMF from chemical sources, is outlined

3.2

Primary cells are distinguished from secondary cells

3.3

Calculations are performed to solve problems involving currents, voltage drops and terminal potential difference of cells connected to form batteries in series and in parallel

3.4

How capacity of a battery is measured is explained

3.5

Construction of typical batteries used in marine environments is outlined

4

Apply principles of electromagnetism to EMF generation

4.1

Form and properties of the magnetic fields surrounding single conductor and multi-turn solenoid coils when carrying an electrical current are compared and contrasted

4.2

Terms and symbols used in Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws of electromagnetic induction are used correctly

4.3

Calculations are performed using Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws of electromagnetic induction to solve problems related to electromagnetism and EMF generation

4.4

Fleming’s Right Hand Rule is outlined

5

Explain operation of direct current rotating machinery

5.1

Construction and methods of maintaining and repairing typical direct current (DC) machines are illustrated

5.2

Principle wiring arrangements used with DC machines are outlined

5.3

Action of the commutator in DC generators is outlined

5.4

Significance of Back EMF (Eb) in the operation of DC motors is outlined

5.5

Mathematical formula are applied to show relationships between operational parameters of DC motors

5.6

Calculations are performed to solve simple problems relating to power output and efficiency in DC motors

6

Explain operation of AC rotating machinery

6.1

How three-phase AC may be developed out of simple single phase AC is explained

6.2

Difference between Star and Delta connections is outlined

6.3

How a three-phase supply can generate a rotating magnetic field is explained

6.4

Construction of an AC synchronous generator is outlined

6.5

Construction of an AC induction motor is outlined

6.6

Calculations are performed to show how driving torque is produced in an induction motor

7

Explain parallel operation and load sharing of generator

7.1

Load/voltage curves of AC and DC generators are compared

7.2

Main requirements for satisfactory power sharing between both AC and DC generators are outlined

7.3

Sequences that occur when load changes on two DC generators working in parallel without an equaliser connection are outlined

7.4

Effect of varying power factors on the load/voltage curve of an AC generator is outlined

Range is restricted to essential operating conditions and any other variables essential to the work environment.

Operational parameters of DC motors must include:

current

flux density

torque

voltage

Evidence required to demonstrate competence in this unit must be relevant to and satisfy all of the requirements of the elements, performance criteria and range of conditions on at least one occasion and include:

applying relevant work health and safety/occupational health and safety (WHS/OHS) requirements and work practices

assessing own work outcomes and maintaining knowledge of current codes, standards, regulations and industry practices

identifying and applying relevant mathematical formulas and techniques to solve basic problems related to marine electrotechnology

identifying and interpreting numerical and graphical information, and performing mathematical calculations such as resistance of electrical conductors, power output and efficiency in DC motors, and driving torque in induction motors

identifying, collating and processing information required to perform basic calculations related to marine electrotechnology

performing accurate and reliable calculations

reading and interpreting written information needed to perform basic electrical calculations

solving problems using appropriate laws and principles.

Evidence required to demonstrate competence in this unit must be relevant to and satisfy all of the requirements of the elements, performance criteria and range of conditions and include knowledge of:

AC:

rotating machinery

principles

basic electrical circuits

basic principles of marine electrotechnology

batteries

DC:

rotating machinery

motors

difference between AC and DC

electrical:

current

power

safety

units of measurement

electromagnetic:

induction

force

effective verbal, written and visual communication techniques

Ohm’s Law

parallel circuits

principles of electromagnetism and electrolytic action

resistance

series circuits

WHS/OHS requirements and work practices.

Assessors must satisfy National Vocational Education and Training Regulator (NVR)/Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) assessor requirements.

Assessment must satisfy the National Vocational Education and Training Regulator (NVR)/Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) standards.

Assessment processes and techniques must be appropriate to the language, literacy and numeracy requirements of the work being performed and the needs of the candidate.

Assessment must occur in workplace operational situations or where these are not available, in simulated workplace operational situations or an industry-approved marine operations site that replicates workplace conditions where basic principles of marine electrotechnology can be applied.

Resources for assessment include access to:

electrical diagrams, specifications and other information required for performing basic electrical calculations

relevant and appropriate tools, equipment and personal protective equipment currently used in industry

relevant documentation including workplace procedures, regulations, codes of practice and operation manuals

technical reference library with current publications on basic marine electrotechnology.

Performance should be demonstrated consistently over time and in a suitable range of contexts.

Copy and paste from the following performance criteria to create an observation checklist for each task. When you have finished writing your assessment tool every one of these must have been addressed, preferably several times in a variety of contexts. To ensure this occurs download the assessment matrix for the unit; enter each assessment task as a column header and place check marks against each performance criteria that task addresses.

Observation Checklist

Tasks to be observed according to workplace/college/TAFE policy and procedures, relevant legislation and Codes of Practice Yes No Comments/feedback
Terms and symbols used in the formula for resistivity are used correctly 
How resistance varies with changes in conductor length and cross sectional area is outlined 
How resistance varies with temperature is outlined 
Calculations are performed that illustrate how material properties affect resistance of electrical conductors 
Main sources of EMF are identified 
Terms and symbols used in Ohm’s Law are used correctly 
Calculations are performed using Ohm’s Law to solve problems involving internal, external and variable resistances in both series and parallel circuits 
Calculations are performed to determine power required and /or energy expended by electrical devices 
Circuits for a wheatstone bridge and a slide wire bridge are sketched and their application on a ship is outlined 
Calculations are performed dealing with resistances, currents and voltage drops in bridge circuits under null or balanced conditions 
How the theory of electrolytic disassociation when applied to common electrolytic solutions and electrode materials explains the generation of EMF from chemical sources, is outlined 
Primary cells are distinguished from secondary cells 
Calculations are performed to solve problems involving currents, voltage drops and terminal potential difference of cells connected to form batteries in series and in parallel 
How capacity of a battery is measured is explained 
Construction of typical batteries used in marine environments is outlined 
Form and properties of the magnetic fields surrounding single conductor and multi-turn solenoid coils when carrying an electrical current are compared and contrasted 
Terms and symbols used in Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws of electromagnetic induction are used correctly 
Calculations are performed using Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws of electromagnetic induction to solve problems related to electromagnetism and EMF generation 
Fleming’s Right Hand Rule is outlined 
Construction and methods of maintaining and repairing typical direct current (DC) machines are illustrated 
Principle wiring arrangements used with DC machines are outlined 
Action of the commutator in DC generators is outlined 
Significance of Back EMF (Eb) in the operation of DC motors is outlined 
Mathematical formula are applied to show relationships between operational parameters of DC motors 
Calculations are performed to solve simple problems relating to power output and efficiency in DC motors 
How three-phase AC may be developed out of simple single phase AC is explained 
Difference between Star and Delta connections is outlined 
How a three-phase supply can generate a rotating magnetic field is explained 
Construction of an AC synchronous generator is outlined 
Construction of an AC induction motor is outlined 
Calculations are performed to show how driving torque is produced in an induction motor 
Load/voltage curves of AC and DC generators are compared 
Main requirements for satisfactory power sharing between both AC and DC generators are outlined 
Sequences that occur when load changes on two DC generators working in parallel without an equaliser connection are outlined 
Effect of varying power factors on the load/voltage curve of an AC generator is outlined 
Main sources of EMF are identified 
Terms and symbols used in Ohm’s Law are used correctly 
Calculations are performed using Ohm’s Law to solve problems involving internal, external and variable resistances in both series and parallel circuits 
Calculations are performed to determine power required and /or energy expended by electrical devices 
Circuits for a wheatstone bridge and a slide wire bridge are sketched and their application on a ship is outlined 
Calculations are performed dealing with resistances, currents and voltage drops in bridge circuits under null or balanced conditions 

Forms

Assessment Cover Sheet

MARL010 - Apply basic principles of marine electrotechnology
Assessment task 1: [title]

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I declare that the assessment tasks submitted for this unit are my own work.

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Assessment Record Sheet

MARL010 - Apply basic principles of marine electrotechnology

Student name:

Student ID:

Assessment task 1: [title] Result: Competent Not yet competent

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Overall assessment result: Competent Not yet competent

Assessor name:

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